Benguet Hand-Woven Face Mask

Makabayan BWSKU: MB07KalFM

Price:
Sale price€16,95 EUR

Description

Be protected everywhere you go while celebrating the beauty of Benguet hand-woven fabric.

Each mask is multi-layered. The top layer is a weave and the second and third fabric are added for protection, with a pocket for inserts (eg tissue or replaceable filters). 
  • Hand-woven fabric makes each face mask one-of-a-kind
  • Size: 5.5" x 9.5" (H14cm x W24cm)
  • Special Feature: Has filter pocket and each mask comes with 3 filters
  • Comes directly from the Benguet province in the Philippines
  • Garter earloop with earsaver.
  • The structure of the masks keep the wearers stylish and safe. 

Let's support the Philippines' rich legacy of hand-crafted products. Each piece is unique. No two masks are identical even if they are cut from the same weave. It takes many days or over a week to weave the fabric, often using a backstrap loom. So our makers ensure they maximize every inch of the precious weaves and minimize waste. 

*Please note that there may be some variations with the patterns in the masks even though they’re cut from the same fabric as our makers try to minimise waste of these previous indigenous weaves.

CULTURAL MEANING:

Dubbed as ‘Philippine’s Salad Bowl’, Benguet is a major source of upland vegetables in the country and its major city, Baguio, is also locally popular as the summer capital.

The people of Benguet have a rich history and culture brought about by its inhabitants, the Ibalois, the Kankana-eys and other ethnic-linguistic groups belonging to a collective indigeonous people called Igorot. 

Although this particular design of weave is part of Ibaloi's traditional costume, the colors red, black are commonly seen in Igorot traditional wear across the region. These colours reflect deeply their community life and values. Red signifies bravery and independence (for example, in history, they never succumbed to foreign colonisation), whilst the black and white stands for their reverence to their ancestors and the wearer’s social status. In modern times, the Igorots continue to wear these weaves and these colours, in ritual dances, in community events and occasions. These are worn with so much pride and love for their heritage.

*Info courtesy of Makabayan.UK


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